2021 Annual Scientific Meeting

Legal aspects of Child & Adolescent health

& AWARDS DINNER

11 & 12 September 2021
Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart, Tasmania

Worried about COVID-19 and border closures?
We have flexible LIVE and VIRTUAL attendance options!
More information below.

SPEAKERS

Guest Speakers

MAURICE WALLIN KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Speaker TBC
Topic coming soon...

DINNER GUEST SPEAKER: The Honourable Elise Archer MP
Attorney-General, Minister for Justice, Corrections, Workplace Safety & Consumer Affairs, and the Arts, Liberal Member for Clark
Topic coming soon...

Senior Sergeant Marcus Cryer
Queensland Police
Youth in Custody

Bill Madden
Lawyer, Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers
Financial Compensation for Child Sex Abuse Victims

Dr John Kasinathan
Conjoint Senior Lecturer UNSW, Visiting Fellow ANU, Consultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist Psychiatrist
Treatment of Sexual Deviant Disorders in Adolescents and Young People: Opportunities to Reduce Harm


College Speakers

Professor Roy Beran
Consultant Neurologist and accredited Sleep Physician

Adolescent Drivers - Are We Doing Enough?

Professor Mike O'Connor AM (co-presented with Mr Bill Madden)
Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School Of Medicine, Western Sydney University
Treatment for Gender Dysphoria in Children and the Role of the Courts

Dr Maria Dudycz
Medical Doctor and Academic Tutor at University of Melbourne - MB BS, LL.B[Hons], FACLM, GAICD
Rapid Uptake of Telehealth During COVID-19 for Adolescent Mental Health – Medical and Legal Challenges

Dr Katherine Robinson
Forensic Medical Officer, Queensland Clinical Forensic Medicine Unit
Interpreting the Toxicological Analysis of Hair in Children from Clandestine Laboratories

Clinical A/Prof. Sandra Johnson
Paediatrician
Children and Technology

PROGRAM

We may make changes to the program if necessary.

The program is close to being finalised, however you are still welcome to express your interest in speaking. Please email your abstract and a short biography to aclm9@legalmedicine.com.au. Please include a brief explanation of how your presentation will highlight the Legal Aspects of Child & Adolescent Health. A $100 registration discount is offered to all open and ACLM speakers.

View the full program at the bottom of this page!

Day 1 - Saturday - 11 September 2020

9.00 am - 3.30 pm: Annual Scientific Meeting
3.30 pm - 4.30 pm: Tentative - ACLM Annual General Meeting - Live event only
7.00 pm - 10.00 pm: Awards Dinner (Harbour View 1 room) - Live event only

Day 2 - Sunday - 12 September 2020

9.00 am - 12.15 pm: Annual Scientific Meeting continues (lunch included after close for Live attendees)

ATTENDING THE LIVE EVENT vs VIRTUAL EVENT

LIVE EVENT - HOBART

Attendees will experience...

VIRTUAL EVENT - VIA OUR EVENT APP

Attendees will experience...

Majority of ASM speakers live in Hobart

All ASM speakers live-streamed via the 2021 ASM Event App (Whova)

Any speakers unable to travel to Hobart for unavoidable reasons will be live streamed via

data projectors

Simply log in to the App and watch each session live from the comfort of your home on a mobile phone, tablet, laptop or desktop computer

Stunning, waterfront location at the Hotel Grand Chancellor with full catering for breaks provided

Submit questions to the speakers via instant messaging on the App

Saturday evening Annual Awards Dinner in the spectacular Harbour View Room with Guest Speaker: The Honourable Elise Archer MP

Initiate or join in-person and virtual meet-ups with your fellow attendees - before, during and after the event

Full access to the 2021 ASM Event App (Whova) containing electronic program, travel information, announcements and networking opportunities

Full access to the 2021 ASM Event App (Whova) containing electronic program, travel information, announcements and networking opportunities

Ability to instantly switch to virtual attendance if unable to attend Hobart due to sickness, lockdowns or border restrictions, even at the last minute!

Opportunity to switch to live (Hobart) attendance up until 14 days prior to the event by paying the price difference, or until Hobart seats are sold out

COST

LIVE EVENT - HOBART

(All prices inc. GST)

VIRTUAL EVENT - VIA OUR EVENT APP

(All prices inc. GST)

ACLM members

$600

ACLM members

$500

Non members

$700

Non members

$600

Additional dinner guest

$130

 

Open and ACLM speakers receive a $100 discount on their registration fee.

CANCELLATION POLICY

Cancellation Policy – Live Attendees (Hobart) 

A refund less $150 administration fee will be provided for all cancellations received at least 30 days prior to the ASM 2021 start date. Any cancellations after this point will be non-refundable.*

Live attendees have full access to the virtual event online via the 2021 ASM Event App (Whova), so if you need to switch to virtual attendance due to sickness or lockdowns, you may do so even at the last minute or during the event. Please note: no refund of the price difference will be issued. 

*If you are unwell at the time of the event, you can choose whether to attend the virtual ASM 2021 via live streaming, or alternatively receive a full refund. Do not attend the live event if you are unwell.

Cancellation Policy – Virtual Attendees (Online)

A refund less $150 administration fee will be provided for all cancellations received at least 30 days prior to the ASM 2021 start date. Any cancellations after this point will be non-refundable.

Note: Out of courtesy to the speakers and event organisers, please do your utmost to attend live in Hobart if you have selected this option unless unavoidable or COVID-related reasons prevent you from doing so.

COVID-19 SAFETY FOR LIVE EVENT

The venue, Hotel Grand Chancellor Hobart, has a COVID-19 Hotel Safety Plan which meets the requirements of the Tasmanian Government.

As part of our commitment to making the live event COVIDSafe, you must comply with the following directions:

- Do not attend this in-person event if you are unwell. This includes if you are currently or have recently experienced cough, fever, sore throat, fatigue, loss of smell or taste, vomiting, diarrhoea, or shortness of breath. If you are displaying these symptoms at the event, you will be asked to leave.

- Do not attend this event if you have been in close contact with a person who is positive with COVID-19, or if you have been required to self-isolate or quarantine by the government.

- As per our Cancellation Policy, if you have registered to attend the ASM 2021 in Hobart, and you are unable to attend in person due to travel restrictions, border closures, lockdowns by the government, travel restrictions by your employer, or COVID-19 or illness at the time of the event, you will be able to attend the ASM 2021 virtually instead.

- It is your responsibility to check the latest border, travel and quarantine restrictions of both Tasmania and your home state/country to ensure you are safe and able to travel to and from this event. This includes registering your travel here - https://www.coronavirus.tas.gov.au/travellers-and-visitors/coming-to-tasmania. By attending in person, you agree to personally carry all risks associated with the potential for sudden and unforeseen COVID cases & associated border/quarantine requirements to change if an outbreak was to occur in your home state or in Tasmania, which may cause you to have to quarantine or self-isolate due to your travel.

- Please be familiar with and adhere to COVID Safe hygiene practices - https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/keeping-yourself-safe/what-you-can-do:

        - Wherever possible, 1.5m physical distancing should be adhered to during this event. To minimise movement at the venue, please must stay
           within your chosen seat where practical.
        - It is not mandatory to wear a face mask at this event. However we recommend that you carry a face mask and wear it when physical
           distancing of 1.5m cannot be met.
        - Wash and sanitize your hands frequently and follow hygienic practices when coughing or sneezing.
        - Check in at the Hotel Grand Chancellor using the Check in TAS app – please download this app.

The following measures are in place at the Hotel Grand Chancellor Hobart to ensure a COVIDSafe event:

- Implementation of a COVID-19 Hotel Safety Plan which meets the requirements of the Tasmanian Government, including regular cleaning and other safety measures. (Plan will be available on our website.)

- The allocated room for the ASM 2021, Grand Ballroom 2 Parts,  is approximately 374sqm. The room has a maximum capacity of 187 persons under the 2sqm per person rule. Attendee numbers are kept well below the allowed maximum room capacity to prevent crowding. Attendees will be seated 1.5m apart wherever possible.

- The allocated room for the Awards Dinner 2021, Harbour View 1,  is approximately 323sqm. The room has a maximum capacity of 161 persons under the 2sqm per person rule. Attendee numbers are kept well below the allowed maximum room capacity to prevent crowding. In accordance with government guidelines, tables will be spaced at least 1.5m apart. Please note: 1.5m distancing does not apply to persons seated on the same table. We will be reducing the number of guests per table as well to reduce risk.

- Santiser and hand washing facilities will be available throughout the venue, as well as rubbish bins.

- Appropriate signage for maximum room capacities, physical distancing and hygiene.

- A response plan for any positive COVID-19 cases. If you become unwell while attending the event, please seek assistance from a member of the Hotel Grand Chancellor staff for further instructions.

REGISTER HERE!

Registration is now open!

Fill in the form below and pay to secure your spot. If you have any trouble with the form, please contact aclm9@legalmedicine.com.au.

Did you know...?

LIVE ATTENDEES can instantly switch to virtual attendance if unable to attend Hobart due to sickness, lockdowns or border restrictions, even at the last minute!
VIRTUAL ATTENDEES can switch to live (Hobart) attendance up until 14 days prior to the event by paying the price difference, or until Hobart seats are sold out.

Active_ASM 2021 - Hobart & Virtual

Attendee Details

Address
Line 1
Line 2
City
State/Province
Zip/Postal
Country

Registration Type

Live Event Additional Information

Skip this section if you selected VIRTUAL attendance.
Attendance at the Awards Dinner is included in your registration fee. It includes a three course formal dinner and beverages, with speech by The Honourable Elise Archer MP, and presentation of new Fellow & Member awards. You must confirm whether you will be attending the dinner.
Will you be attending the Awards Dinner? *
You are welcome to bring a guest to the dinner for an additional fee of $130 per guest (incl. GST). Please advise below if you are bringing a guest to the dinner.

Acceptance of Policies

Acceptance of Policies

Payment Method

Pay via *
Credit Card *
Includes Registration Fee plus non-refundable 1.9% Credit Card processing and handling fee

DOWNLOAD OUR EVENT APP

Get our official conference app
For Blackberry or Windows Phone, Click here
For feature details, visit Whova

Loading...

SPEAKER ABSTRACTS & BIOGRAPHIES

Guest Speakers

MAURICE WALLIN KEYNOTE ADDRESS:  Speaker TBC

Coming soon...

DINNER GUEST SPEAKER: The Honourable Elise Archer MP | Title coming soon...

Dinner Guest Speech title coming soon...

The Honourable Elise Archer MP - Attorney-General, Minister for Justice, Corrections, Workplace Safety & Consumer Affairs, and the Arts, Liberal Member for Clark
Biography coming soon...

Senior Sergeant Marcus Cryer | Youth in Custody

Youth in Custody
Legislated change on 12 Feb 2018, aligned Queensland with all other states moving seventeen-year-old’s into the Youth Justice System. Two months later, both of Queensland Youth Detention Centers reached capacity and Industrial Action by Unions, saw legislated capacity numbers capped with Brisbane Youth Detention center doors closing on new child offender admissions. Centre closures led to over 65 children being held at one stage within the Brisbane City Watchhouse for periods of up to 42 days. Indigenous children as young as 11, were flown from North Queensland and held in custody until being flown back to Townsville (Cleveland) Youth Detention Centre.

Senior Sergeant Marcus Cryer - Queensland Police
Marcus Cryer is a Senior Sergeant of Police, with over 29 years of policing experience and qualified as a current Police Negotiator. As the Officer in Charge of Qld’s largest watchhouse for 7 years, he has positively inspired and improved the culture and capabilities of 93 staff (60 sworn and 33 staff members) by building trust and respect, encouraging diversity and inclusion through participative leadership.

He is currently seconded as the Capability lead, working with GSA Consulting to lead the QPS Service Delivery Redesign Project, conducting a project with future introduction scheduled across all policing districts in Qld. In late 2019, he finished his Master of Professional Studies, with his research results leading to a current trial involving the Qld Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions and Police Prosecutions, surrounding the timely presentation of evidence and engagement of the ODPP to overview criminal matters presented before Queensland Higher Courts, to enable shorter case dispositions.

Bill Madden | Financial Compensation for Child Sex Abuse Victims

Financial Compensation for Child Sex Abuse Victims
In contrast to the 2002 law reforms restricting financial compensation for persons impacted by medical negligence, more recent reforms for child sex abuse victims made easier the recovery of ‘common law’ compensation and created an optional ‘redress scheme’ pathway. Medical practitioners may well have patients who would benefit from the recent reforms, which are explained in this session.

Mr Bill Madden - Lawyer, Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers
Bill Madden is a lawyer in private practice with Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers, specialising in civil liability litigation (medical litigation and intentional torts). Bill's medical law practice includes matters arising from birth trauma, brain injury, delayed cancer diagnosis and wrongful birth. His intentional tort practice includes institutional child sexual abuse matters.

Bill is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Law, and an accredited Mediator through the Law Society of New South Wales. He has adjunct appointments in both the law and medical schools at Western Sydney University, in the Australian Centre for Health Law Research at Queensland University of Technology and in the Melbourne Law Masters program at the University of Melbourne.

Dr John Kasinathan  | Treatment of Sexual Deviant Disorders in Adolescents and Young People: Opportunities to Reduce Harm

Treatment of Sexual Deviant Disorders in Adolescents and Young People: Opportunities to Reduce Harm
Objective: To outline current understanding and recommended treatments for paraphilic or sexual deviant disorders in adolescents and youth.
Method: An overview of the diagnosis, development and scope of paraphilic disorders. Evidence and an algorithm for pharmacological treatments in youth are outlined.
Results
: Paraphilic disorders are relatively common in adolescents and youth, with fantasies and urges preceding the onset of deviant behaviour by a handful of years. Research in youth is sparse, but the available evidence supports that paraphilic disorders respond favourably to psychological and pharmacological treatments.
Conclusions
: The detection of paraphilic disorders in adolescents and youth presents a window of opportunity, where treatment may be provided before deviant behaviour occurs, potentially reducing the future incidence of sexual abuse.

Dr John Kasinathan - Conjoint Senior Lecturer UNSW, Visiting Fellow ANU, Consultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist Psychiatrist
Dr John Kasinathan is a senior forensic, child and adolescent psychiatrist, a conjoint senior lecturer with UNSW and visiting fellow with the ANU. His specialist appointments are as Clinical Director for adolescent forensic psychiatry in NSW; visiting medical officer with forensic mental health services in Canberra, and Medical Director for a private adolescent and youth inpatient program at Northside Clinic St Leonards.

College & Open Speakers

Professor Roy Beran | Adolescent Drivers - Are We Doing Enough?

Adolescent Drivers - Are We Doing Enough?
Introduction
The minimum eligible driving age in Australia is 15 years 9 months, in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), and 16 years elsewhere in the country. Approval to drive mandates: appropriate age; completing computer-generated testing; and monitored Graduated Licensing Schemes.
The National Road Safety Strategy 2011 - 2020, released by the Australian Transport Council, either has been or is being implemented, including sponsorship of the Australasian College of Road Safety and establishing Cabinet representation for road safety.

What Provokes Adolescent Road Accidents
Factors include: driving ability; developmental factors; personality; demographics; general environment; and driving environment. The Graduated Licensing process has counted driver inexperience but immaturity and peer pressure remain additional considerations.

Potential Modes of Intervention
Complementing Graduated Licensing, parental and respected directives and guidance are essential to minimise negative peer pressure. Specific counselling and other targeted interventions may also assist.

Special Consideration
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or adolescent epilepsy demand appropriate management to facilitate driving in accordance with the AUSTROADS Guidelines.

Conclusion
A composite targeted approach is required to deal with adolescent road fatalities and injuries.

Professor Roy Beran - Consultant Neurologist and accredited Sleep Physician
Professor Beran is trained as a consultant neurologist and accredited sleep physician, in addition to working within legal, military and aviation medicine. His qualifications include: MBBS, MD, FRACP, FRACGP, Grad. Dip. Tertiary Ed., Grad. Dip. Further Ed., FAFPHM, FACLM, FRCP, FACBS, B Leg. S, MHL and FFFLM (Hon). He is a Conjoint Professor of Medicine in the South Western Clinical School at the University of New South Wales and Liverpool Hospital, Professor in the School of Medicine at Griffith University, Queensland, and Professor Chair, Medical Law, at Sechenov Moscow First State University, Moscow, Russia. He is a founding Fellow of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine, a Past President thereof, having stepped down in 2011, and only the second elected Honorary Fellow of the College and is an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Forensic & Legal Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians (London).

Professor Mike O'Connor AM & Mr Bill Madden | Treatment for Gender Dysphoria in Children and the Role of the Courts

Treatment for Gender Dysphoria in Children and the Role of the Courts
The diagnosis of gender dysphoria in children relies on a self-declaration by those whose gender identity or expression does not match the sex they received at birth. There is no definitive biological test which would enable clinicians to determine if the child’s claim is long lasting. Approximately 88 percent of children who express gender dysphoria ‘desist’, mostly by the onset of puberty.

The Family Court of Australia has recently restricted its determinations of gender transformation in children to more controversial cases involving disagreement between the parties. (Re: Kelvin [2017] FamCAFC 258 (30 November 2017).

Hitherto the second stage treatment of gender dysphoria in children required a court order under s 67ZC of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) as parents were not considered at liberty to make that decision. The appellate court held that stage 2 treatments can no longer be considered a medical procedure for which consent lies outside the bounds of parental authority and so it no longer requires the imprimatur of the court. Now transgender children and their families who are in agreement need not to seek authorization of the Court to undertake either Stage 1 (pubarche blockade with gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonists) or Stage 2 treatment (cross hormone therapy such as oestrogen for transgender males). Stage 1 treatment to suppress pubarche would nowadays be commenced at Tanner stage 2[1] which commences as early as 9.96 years in girls and 10.14 years in boys. Suppression of puberty would continue until the age of 16 years when cross hormonal treatment would begin.

The assertion that suppression of puberty by GnRH analogues either in cases of precocious puberty or gender dysphoria is ‘safe and reversible’ (Bell & Bell, 2017[2]) may warrant revisiting, despite the FCA having already accepted that assertion.

This paper argues that Stage 1 & 2 treatments for gender dysphoria in children and adolescents are not innocuous and that, given the high rate of revocation, some form of independent arbiter should still be required to sanction such treatment. It is further argued that an objective biological test of gender dysphoria would be useful to identify true cases of gender dysphoria which will persist beyond adolescence.

Professor Mike O'Connor AM - Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School Of Medicine, Western Sydney University
Mike O’Connor is Professor of O&G at Western Sydney University and a Visiting Obstetrician & Gynaecologist at The St George Hospital, Kogarah, and St George Private Hospital, where he is Chairman of the Patient Care and Clinical Review Committee. He is a Conjoint Senior Lecturer at UNSW in the Division of Women’s and Children’s Health and Lecturer at Sydney University. From 1981-1983 he was Medical Superintendent at the Women’s Hospital (Crown St.) in Sydney. For 6 years Mike O’Connor was a Federal Councillor of the Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists, representing NSW and served as Vice President of the College from 2002-2004. His College work included the development of an Indigenous Health Worker training program in antenatal care, adult and neonatal resuscitation courses as well as courses on the management of sexual assault. He established the Chapter of Military O&G in the RANZCOG and is its Chairman. Mike O’Connor was awarded the Gold Medal of the RCOG at the MRCOG exams in 1975 and in 1982 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine (Sydney University). He holds Diplomas in Diagnostic Ultrasound & Child Health. He is an active member of the ACLM, the ASCCP and the ASUM. He has a Master’s degree in Health Law from Sydney University and a Master’s degree in Forensic Medicine from Monash University. He acts for both Plaintiffs and Defendants as an expert witness. He is a section editor for the Journal of Law and Medicine. In 2009 he was created a Member of the Order of Australia in recognition of his longstanding work in Indigenous Health.

Mr Bill Madden - Lawyer, Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers
Bill Madden is a lawyer in private practice with Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers, specialising in civil liability litigation (medical litigation and intentional torts). Bill's medical law practice includes matters arising from birth trauma, brain injury, delayed cancer diagnosis and wrongful birth. His intentional tort practice includes institutional child sexual abuse matters.

Bill is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Law, and an accredited Mediator through the Law Society of New South Wales. He has adjunct appointments in both the law and medical schools at Western Sydney University, in the Australian Centre for Health Law Research at Queensland University of Technology and in the Melbourne Law Masters program at the University of Melbourne.

Dr Maria Dudycz | Rapid Uptake of Telehealth During COVID-19 for Adolescent Mental Health – Medical and Legal Challenges

Rapid Uptake of Telehealth During COVID-19 for Adolescent Mental Health – Medical and Legal Challenges
Engagement is the cornerstone of establishing the doctor/patient therapeutic relationship facilitating trust to enable shared decision making in youth mental health. Adolescence is a challenging time to establish such a relationship. With the accelerated introduction of telehealth during Covid-19, benefits and further challenges arose in mental health. Telehealth offered the ability to stay connected to youth during physical lockdown. However, if using only the phone, no visual cues were available to view adolescents or surroundings. Ramifications include identification of who is on the phone, determining legal consent/mature minor, ensuring confidentiality, ascertaining legal duties under reportable requirements, determining safety to self and others. How successful are our medical and legal duties met to the mentally ill adolescent when at the outset engagement is weakened and we are operating without our sense of sight?

Dr Maria Dudycz - Medical Doctor and Academic Tutor at University of Melbourne - MB BS, LL.B[Hons], FACLM, GAICD
Dr Maria Dudycz has degrees in both medicine and law (honours) from the University of Melbourne. She served as a Senior Tribunal Member of Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal for 15 years in the Human Rights divisions leading reforms in particular to restrictive options with respect to sterilisation of disabled persons under the Guardianship Act 1986 (Vic) and reforming oversight of usage of physical, mechanical and chemical restraints under the Disability Act 2006(Vic). Maria also has extensive governance experience as an inaugural Director of the National Breast Cancer Centre, Chair of the Advisory Panel on Marketing in Australia of Infant Formula (WHO obligation) where she was able to break a 2-year deadlock of a non-functional Panel implementing procedural reforms, and Victorian Chair and Councillor of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine during its early years. In 2017, she was awarded an inaugural Victorian Women's Leadership Scholarship to undertake the Australian Institute of Company Director's Course to upskill on current governance issues facing organisations. In 2018, she was recognised for her contributions to vulnerable Victorians/Australians by being inducted onto the Victorian Honour Roll of Women. She currently is on the Alumni Council for the University of Melbourne, mentors students at the same University and works as a general practitioner for Headspace.

Clinical Associate Professor Peter Winterton  | Legal Instruments in Child Protection

Legal Instruments in Child Protection
This paper examines the case of TS. Her case has been widely discussed in the media.
In dissecting TS’ case the legal instruments that were used to protect her and their success or failure are examined. The toll that cases such as TS take on both medical and legal practitioners are highlighted both in specialty practice and also in general practice.

Clinical Associate Professor Peter Winterton - Child Protection Physician at Perth Children's Hospital & General Practitioner
Dr Winterton has been in medical practice for over 40 years both as a general practitioner and as a child protection physician at Perth Children’s Hospital in Perth. He was Medical Director of the Child Protection Unit 1999-2013.

Over his time of practice child sexual abuse became a clearly recognised problem in paediatric care. He has been an expert witness in many cases involving both child sexual and physical abuse. He has as special interest in abusive head trauma. He was instrumental in the launching of the Shaken Baby Prevention programme In Western Australia. At the present time he is endeavoring to establish a medical service for children in state care.

Dr Katherine Robinson | Interpreting the Toxicological Analysis of Hair in Children from Clandestine Laboratories

Interpreting the Toxicological Analysis of Hair in Children from Clandestine Laboratories
Drugs and trace elements circulating in the body may be incorporated into growing hair, where they remain for the life of the hair. Unlike blood and urine, which provide short-term evidence of exposure to a drug, hair may be used as evidence of historical exposure. The analysis of consecutive segments of hair may allow for the construction of a timeline of exposure. One application of hair testing is in the evaluation of children removed from dwellings containing clandestine drug laboratories, where evidence of exposure to methylamphetamine and precursor chemicals may be found in hair. This presentation will discuss the utility of hair testing in this unique population.

Dr Katherine Robinson
Dr Robinson graduated from the University of Queensland with her medical degree in 1996.  After completing her residency at the Royal Brisbane Hospital, Katherine worked as a registrar in Histopathology. After taking some time off to start a family, she returned to clinical work as a Senior Medical Officer in the Intensive Care Unit of The Wesley Hospital. It was here that Katherine completed research in hormonal fluctuations in critical illness.  In 2014, Katherine commenced work as a Forensic Physician in the Clinical Forensic Medicine Unit in Brisbane, Queensland. She has a special interest in Hair Toxicology and its application to Forensic Medicine.

A/Prof. Sandra Johnson | Children and Technology

Children and Technology
Abstract coming soon...

A/Prof. Sandra Johnson - Paediatrician
Sandra Johnson is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Children’s Hospital Westmead Clinical School of the University of Sydney and she is a developmental paediatrician who has been in private practice in Sydney for the past 26 years. She has worked in the field of Paediatrics since 1983 having spent the prior 3 years in General Practice and Adult Medicine. She did her training in Paediatrics at teaching hospitals in Cape Town, London, Toronto, Boston and Sydney. Sandra is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (FRACP), Fellow of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health UK (FRCPCH) and Fellow of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine (FACLM). She has been a member of ACLM since 1997, was secretary for Council from 2009-2013, Vice President Academic from 2014-2017, and President from 2017-2019. Sandra is the main author of “A clinical handbook on child development paediatrics” written for doctors and allied health professionals; she is the publisher and author of a book for parents “Your child’s development”; she has written a chapter in the textbook “Legal Medicine” (Editor: Beran); and she has written several peer reviewed journal articles. She enjoys writing and teaching topics related to Paediatrics and Legal Medicine.