NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT:

ACLM places a high importance on the health and safety of all persons, including our members and the wider public. We have been closely monitoring the developments of COVID-19 around Australia and assessing the possible impact on our upcoming events.

Due to health risks, along with ongoing changes to border closures, travel restrictions and quarantine measures in each state, the ACLM Council has decided to postpone the 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting – Legal Aspects of Child and Adolescent Health, which was to be held in Hobart later this year.

We intend to postpone the entire event to 2021, with the location (Hobart, Tasmania) and theme remaining the same. The new date is to be determined later this year and will be influenced by our speakers’ and venue availability.

Annual Scientific Meeting

Legal aspects of Child & Adolescent health

& AWARDS DINNER

Postponed - Date To Be Confirmed
Hotel Grand Chancellor - Hobart, Tasmania

Call for papers

The program is currently finalised, however due to the postponement of the ASM, we are still accepting papers in case a space becomes available on the program. 

To express your interest in speaking, email your abstract and a short biography to aclm9@legalmedicine.com.au. Please include a brief explanation of how your presentation will highlight the Legal Aspects of Child & Adolescent Health.

A $100 registration discount is offered to all open and ACLM speakers.

Speakers & Topics

Guest Speakers:

OPENING ADDRESS: Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AC - Governor of Tasmania

OPENING ADDRESS: Title coming soon...
Abstract coming soon...

Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AC - Governor of Tasmania
Tasmania’s 28th Governor, Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AC, was sworn to Office at Government House on Wednesday 10 December 2014.

Previously she was Professor, Faculty of Law, at the University of Tasmania and Director of the Tasmania Law Reform Institute. She had also in her career at the University held the positions of Dean, Faculty of Law, and Head of School. Following her appointment as Governor, she was made a professor emeritus.

On 26 January 2014 Her Excellency was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for her significant service to the law, particularly in the areas of law reform and education. On 26 January 2017 she was appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) for her eminent service to the people of Tasmania through leading contributions to the legal community, to law reform, to higher education as an academic, researcher and publisher and as a supporter of the arts and environmental and social justice initiatives.

Her teaching interests included Criminal Law, Evidence, Criminology and Sentencing, and her research interests included Sentencing and Criminal Justice. Since her appointment as Governor, she has continued her research in Sentencing, in particular.

She was a Commissioner of the Tasmanian Gaming Commission, with a particular interest in regulation, gaming policy and harm minimisation.

Professor Warner had been a Member of the Sentencing Advisory Council since 2010, and assisted with the preparation of the Council’s discussion papers and reports.

She was a Member of the Board of Legal Education; a Member of the Council of Law Reporting; and Director, Centre for Legal Studies.

In addition to working with the Tasmania Law Reform Institute on its projects, she had been involved in providing advice and submissions on rape law reform, drug diversion and mental health diversion programs and abortion law reform. She also assisted other law reform bodies nationally including the New South Wales Law Reform Commission and the Australian Law Reform Commission.

As the former President of the Alcorso Foundation, Her Excellency supported social and cultural advancement in the community through its programs in the Arts, Environment and Social Justice.

For a full biography, please refer here: https://www.govhouse.tas.gov.au/governor/curriculum-vitae

MAURICE WALLIN KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Magistrate John Lock - QLD Deputy State Coroner (ret.) | Investigating Child Death

MAURICE WALLIN KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Investigating Child Death
Abstract coming soon...

Magistrate John Lock
Magistrate John Lock is recently retired from being QLD Deputy State Coroner. He was a Solicitor and partner in a private legal firm from 1976 to 1998. Magistrate Lock held the positions of senior lawyer Legal Aid Queensland from 1998 to 2002, Magistrate 2002 to 2020, Coroner 2008 to 2013, and Deputy State Coroner 2013 to 2020.

DINNER GUEST SPEAKER: The Honourable Elise Archer MP - Attorney-General, Minister for Justice, Minister for Corrections, Minister for Building and Construction, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Heritage, Liberal Member for Clark

Dinner Guest Speech title coming soon...

The Honourable Elise Archer MP - Attorney-General, Minister for Justice, Minister for Corrections, Minister for Building and Construction, Minister for the Arts and Minister for Heritage, Liberal Member for Clark
Biography coming soon...

Senior Sergeant Marcus Cryer - QLD Police Officer | Youth in Custody

Youth in Custody
Legislated change on 12 Feb 2018, aligned Queensland with all other states moving seventeen-year-old’s into the Youth Justice System. Two months later, both of Queensland Youth Detention Centers reached capacity and Industrial Action by Unions, saw legislated capacity numbers capped with Brisbane Youth Detention center doors closing on new child offender admissions. Centre closures led to over 65 children being held at one stage within the Brisbane City Watchhouse for periods of up to 42 days. Indigenous children as young as 11, were flown from North Queensland and held in custody until being flown back to Townsville (Cleveland) Youth Detention Centre.

Senior Sergeant Marcus Cryer
Marcus Cryer is a Senior Sergeant of Police, with over 29 years of policing experience and qualified as a current Police Negotiator. As the Officer in Charge of Qld’s largest watchhouse for 7 years, he has positively inspired and improved the culture and capabilities of 93 staff (60 sworn and 33 staff members) by building trust and respect, encouraging diversity and inclusion through participative leadership.

He is currently seconded as the Capability lead, working with GSA Consulting to lead the QPS Service Delivery Redesign Project, conducting a project with future introduction scheduled across all policing districts in Qld. In late 2019, he finished his Master of Professional Studies, with his research results leading to a current trial involving the Qld Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions and Police Prosecutions, surrounding the timely presentation of evidence and engagement of the ODPP to overview criminal matters presented before Queensland Higher Courts, to enable shorter case dispositions.

Bill Madden - Lawyer | Financial Compensation for Child Sex Abuse Victims

Financial Compensation for Child Sex Abuse Victims
Abstract coming soon...

Mr Bill Madden - Lawyer, Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers
Bill Madden is a lawyer in private practice with Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law. He has adjunct appointments in both the law and medical schools at Western Sydney University, in the Australian Centre for Health Law Research at Queensland University of Technology and in the Melbourne Law Masters program at the University of Melbourne.
His blog at https://billmaddens.wordpress.com includes updates on medical law issues.

Dr John Kasinathan - Consultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist Psychiatrist | Treatment of Sexual Deviant Disorders in Adolescents and Young People: Opportunities to Reduce Harm

Treatment of Sexual Deviant Disorders in Adolescents and Young People: Opportunities to Reduce Harm
Objective: To outline current understanding and recommended treatments for paraphilic or sexual deviant disorders in adolescents and youth.
Method: An overview of the diagnosis, development and scope of paraphilic disorders. Evidence and an algorithm for pharmacological treatments in youth are outlined.
Results: Paraphilic disorders are relatively common in adolescents and youth, with fantasies and urges preceding the onset of deviant behaviour by a handful of years. Research in youth is sparse, but the available evidence supports that paraphilic disorders respond favourably to psychological and pharmacological treatments.
Conclusions: The detection of paraphilic disorders in adolescents and youth presents a window of opportunity, where treatment may be provided before deviant behaviour occurs, potentially reducing the future incidence of sexual abuse.

Dr John Kasinathan - Conjoint Senior Lecturer UNSW, Visiting Fellow ANU, Consultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist Psychiatrist
Dr John Kasinathan is a senior forensic, child and adolescent psychiatrist, a conjoint senior lecturer with UNSW and visiting fellow with the ANU. His specialist appointments are as Clinical Director for adolescent forensic psychiatry in NSW; visiting medical officer with forensic mental health services in Canberra, and Medical Director for a private adolescent and youth inpatient program at Northside Clinic St Leonards.

Alison Lai - CEO, Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drugs Council of Tasmania | Pill Testing

Pill Testing
Abstract coming soon...

Alison Lai - CEO, Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drugs Council of Tasmania
Biography coming soon...

Open & ACLM Speakers:

Clinical Associate Professor Peter Winterton - Child Protection Physician at Perth Children's Hospital | Legal Instruments in Child Protection

Legal Instruments in Child Protection
This paper examines the case of TS. Her case has been widely discussed in the media.
In dissecting TS’ case the legal instruments that were used to protect her and their success or failure are examined. The toll that cases such as TS take on both medical and legal practitioners are highlighted both in specialty practice and also in general practice.

Clinical Associate Professor Peter Winterton - Child Protection Physician at Perth Children's Hospital & General Practitioner
Dr Winterton has been in medical practice for over 40 years both as a general practitioner and as a child protection physician at Perth Children’s Hospital in Perth. He was Medical Director of the Child Protection Unit 1999-2013.

Over his time of practice child sexual abuse became a clearly recognised problem in paediatric care. He has been an expert witness in many cases involving both child sexual and physical abuse. He has as special interest in abusive head trauma. He was instrumental in the launching of the Shaken Baby Prevention programme In Western Australia. At the present time he is endeavoring to establish a medical service for children in state care.

Professor Mike O'Connor AM - Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, co-presented by Mr Bill Madden - Lawyer | Treatment for Gender Dysphoria in Children and the Role of the Courts

Treatment for Gender Dysphoria in Children and the Role of the Courts
The diagnosis of gender dysphoria in children relies on a self-declaration by those whose gender identity or expression does not match the sex they received at birth. There is no definitive biological test which would enable clinicians to determine if the child’s claim is long lasting. Approximately 88 percent of children who express gender dysphoria ‘desist’, mostly by the onset of puberty.

The Family Court of Australia has recently restricted its determinations of gender transformation in children to more controversial cases involving disagreement between the parties. (Re: Kelvin [2017] FamCAFC 258 (30 November 2017).

Hitherto the second stage treatment of gender dysphoria in children required a court order under s 67ZC of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) as parents were not considered at liberty to make that decision. The appellate court held that stage 2 treatments can no longer be considered a medical procedure for which consent lies outside the bounds of parental authority and so it no longer requires the imprimatur of the court. Now transgender children and their families who are in agreement need not to seek authorization of the Court to undertake either Stage 1 (pubarche blockade with gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonists) or Stage 2 treatment (cross hormone therapy such as oestrogen for transgender males). Stage 1 treatment to suppress pubarche would nowadays be commenced at Tanner stage 2[1] which commences as early as 9.96 years in girls and 10.14 years in boys. Suppression of puberty would continue until the age of 16 years when cross hormonal treatment would begin.

The assertion that suppression of puberty by GnRH analogues either in cases of precocious puberty or gender dysphoria is ‘safe and reversible’ (Bell & Bell, 2017[2]) may warrant revisiting, despite the FCA having already accepted that assertion.

This paper argues that Stage 1 & 2 treatments for gender dysphoria in children and adolescents are not innocuous and that, given the high rate of revocation, some form of independent arbiter should still be required to sanction such treatment. It is further argued that an objective biological test of gender dysphoria would be useful to identify true cases of gender dysphoria which will persist beyond adolescence.

Professor Mike O'Connor AM - Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School Of Medicine, Western Sydney University
Mike O’Connor is Professor of O&G at Western Sydney University and a Visiting Obstetrician & Gynaecologist at The St George Hospital, Kogarah, and St George Private Hospital, where he is Chairman of the Patient Care and Clinical Review Committee. He is a Conjoint Senior Lecturer at UNSW in the Division of Women’s and Children’s Health and Lecturer at Sydney University. From 1981-1983 he was Medical Superintendent at the Women’s Hospital (Crown St.) in Sydney. For 6 years Mike O’Connor was a Federal Councillor of the Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists, representing NSW and served as Vice President of the College from 2002-2004. His College work included the development of an Indigenous Health Worker training program in antenatal care, adult and neonatal resuscitation courses as well as courses on the management of sexual assault. He established the Chapter of Military O&G in the RANZCOG and is its Chairman. Mike O’Connor was awarded the Gold Medal of the RCOG at the MRCOG exams in 1975 and in 1982 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine (Sydney University). He holds Diplomas in Diagnostic Ultrasound & Child Health. He is an active member of the ACLM, the ASCCP and the ASUM. He has a Master’s degree in Health Law from Sydney University and a Master’s degree in Forensic Medicine from Monash University. He acts for both Plaintiffs and Defendants as an expert witness. He is a section editor for the Journal of Law and Medicine. In 2009 he was created a Member of the Order of Australia in recognition of his longstanding work in Indigenous Health.

Mr Bill Madden - Lawyer, Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers
Bill Madden is a lawyer in private practice with Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law. He has adjunct appointments in both the law and medical schools at Western Sydney University, in the Australian Centre for Health Law Research at Queensland University of Technology and in the Melbourne Law Masters program at the University of Melbourne. His blog at https://billmaddens.wordpress.com includes updates on medical law issues.

Dr Katherine Robinson - Forensic Medical Officer | Interpreting the Toxicological Analysis of Hair in Children from Clandestine Laboratories

Interpreting the Toxicological Analysis of Hair in Children from Clandestine Laboratories
Abstract coming soon...

Dr Katherine Robinson
Dr Robinson graduated from the University of Queensland with her medical degree in 1996.  After completing her residency at the Royal Brisbane Hospital, Katherine worked as a registrar in Histopathology. After taking some time off to start a family, she returned to clinical work as a Senior Medical Officer in the Intensive Care Unit of The Wesley Hospital. It was here that Katherine completed research in hormonal fluctuations in critical illness.  In 2014, Katherine commenced work as a Forensic Physician in the Clinical Forensic Medicine Unit in Brisbane, Queensland. She has a special interest in Hair Toxicology and its application to Forensic Medicine.

Professor Roy Beran - Consultant Neurologist | Adolescent Drivers - Are We Doing Enough?

Adolescent Drivers - Are We Doing Enough?
Introduction
The minimum eligible driving age in Australia is 15 years 9 months, in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), and 16 years elsewhere in the country. Approval to drive mandates: appropriate age; completing computer-generated testing; and monitored Graduated Licensing Schemes.
The National Road Safety Strategy 2011 - 2020, released by the Australian Transport Council, either has been or is being implemented, including sponsorship of the Australasian College of Road Safety and establishing Cabinet representation for road safety.

What Provokes Adolescent Road Accidents
Factors include: driving ability; developmental factors; personality; demographics; general environment; and driving environment. The Graduated Licensing process has counted driver inexperience but immaturity and peer pressure remain additional considerations.

Potential Modes of Intervention
Complementing Graduated Licensing, parental and respected directives and guidance are essential to minimise negative peer pressure. Specific counselling and other targeted interventions may also assist.

Special Consideration
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or adolescent epilepsy demand appropriate management to facilitate driving in accordance with the AUSTROADS Guidelines.

Conclusion
A composite targeted approach is required to deal with adolescent road fatalities and injuries.

Professor Roy Beran - Consultant Neurologist and accredited Sleep Physician
Professor Beran is trained as a consultant neurologist and accredited sleep physician, in addition to working within legal, military and aviation medicine. His qualifications include: MBBS, MD, FRACP, FRACGP, Grad. Dip. Tertiary Ed., Grad. Dip. Further Ed., FAFPHM, FACLM, FRCP, FACBS, B Leg. S, MHL and FFFLM (Hon). He is a Conjoint Professor of Medicine in the South Western Clinical School at the University of New South Wales and Liverpool Hospital, Professor in the School of Medicine at Griffith University, Queensland, and Professor Chair, Medical Law, at Sechenov Moscow First State University, Moscow, Russia. He is a founding Fellow of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine, a Past President thereof, having stepped down in 2011, and only the second elected Honorary Fellow of the College and is an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Forensic & Legal Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians (London).

Dr Maria Dudycz - Medical Doctor and Academic Tutor at University of Melbourne | Consent for Mental Health Care Plans for Children and Adolescents | Rapid Uptake of Telehealth During COVID-19 for Adolescent Mental Health – Medical and Legal Challenges

Consent for Mental Health Care Plans for Children and Adolescents
With the need to address mental health issues in children and adolescents, increased by the impact of the recent and ongoing Covid-19 crisis, are young people being properly informed prior to consenting to Mental Health Care Plans? There are potential long-term discriminatory practices that may still exist, vocational opportunities that may be closed and disclosure requirements in various circumstances. What are these?
At present, no consent form exists other than consenting to the MHCP. What are Mental health practitioners informing young people? How do we balance current mental health needs against the young person’s right to know the above long-term implications of MHCP? How will the Covid-19 crisis challenge these pre-existing prejudices given the enormity of the impact on the mental health of a myriad of Australians?

Rapid Uptake of Telehealth During COVID-19 for Adolescent Mental Health – Medical and Legal Challenges
Engagement is the cornerstone of establishing the doctor/patient therapeutic relationship facilitating trust to enable shared decision making in youth mental health. Adolescence is a challenging time to establish such a relationship.
With the accelerated introduction of telehealth during Covid-19, benefits and further challenges arose in mental health. Telehealth offered the ability to stay connected to youth during physical lockdown. However, if using only the phone, no visual cues were available to view adolescents or surroundings. Ramifications include identification of who is on the phone, determining legal consent/mature minor, ensuring confidentiality, ascertaining legal duties under reportable requirements, determining safety to self and others. How successful are our medical and legal duties met to the mentally ill adolescent when at the outset engagement is weakened and we are operating without our sense of sight?

Dr Maria Dudycz - Medical Doctor and Academic Tutor at University of Melbourne - MB BS, LL.B[Hons], FACLM, GAICD
Dr Maria Dudycz has degrees in both medicine and law (honours) from the University of Melbourne. She served as a Senior Tribunal Member of Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal for 15 years in the Human Rights divisions leading reforms in particular to restrictive options with respect to sterilisation of disabled persons under the Guardianship Act 1986 (Vic) and reforming oversight of usage of physical, mechanical and chemical restraints under the Disability Act 2006(Vic). Maria also has extensive governance experience as an inaugural Director of the National Breast Cancer Centre, Chair of the Advisory Panel on Marketing in Australia of Infant Formula (WHO obligation) where she was able to break a 2-year deadlock of a non-functional Panel implementing procedural reforms, and Victorian Chair and Councillor of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine during its early years. In 2017, she was awarded an inaugural Victorian Women's Leadership Scholarship to undertake the Australian Institute of Company Director's Course to upskill on current governance issues facing organisations. In 2018, she was recognised for her contributions to vulnerable Victorians/Australians by being inducted onto the Victorian Honour Roll of Women. She currently is on the Alumni Council for the University of Melbourne, mentors students at the same University and works as a general practitioner for Headspace.

PROGRAM

Day 1 - Saturday - Date TBC

9.00 am - 3.30 pm: Annual Scientific Meeting
3.30 pm - 4.30 pm: AGM
7.00 pm - 10.00 pm: Awards Dinner

Day 2 - Sunday - Date TBC

9.00 am - 12.00 pm: Annual Scientific Meeting (closes with lunch)

Location

ASM & Dinner:
Hotel Grand Chancellor
1 Davey Street
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

COVID-19

ACLM is committed to the health and safety of the community and we will continue to review the COVID-19 situation and government directions. This 2020 ASM is currently postponed to a date to be decided, most likely in 2021. When the event is held, we will take precautions to ensure our event is COVID safe including using a large venue to maintain social distancing.

COST

ACLM Members: $600 inc GST
Non-members: $700 inc GST 

A $100 registration discount is offered to all open and ACLM speakers.

The registration fee includes the Saturday evening Awards Dinner. New ACLM Fellows and Members will be awarded their Testamurs and we will enjoy a presentation by a guest speaker. Please confirm your attendance at the dinner at the time of registering.

You are welcome to bring a partner to the dinner for an additional cost of $130 (inc GST).